SquirrelMender Ventura County

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Squirrelmender Wildlife Rehabilitation
330 Charro AvenueAddress
Thousand Oaks, CA
91320

A tax-exempt, non-profit permitted by the California Department of Fish and Game.

Phone:805-498-8653
E-mail: sharron@squirrelmender.com

Squirrelmender Wildlife Rehabilitation
Address: 330 Charro Avenue
Thousand Oaks, CA 91320
 
phone: 805-498-8653
cell: 805-338-0481

Dead Wildlife

Dead wildlife is the responsibility of the property owner to dispose of (even deer). If the animal is a traffic hazard, the appropriate jurisdiction (City, County, Park Authority, or VDOT for State roads) should be called. Dead wildlife is supposed to be put in a plastic bag and taken to the animal shelter for disposal. It may also be buried at least 6 inches deep, out of public view, and away from trails, streets, ponds and streams. It should be handled carefully with gloves (discarded afterward) or a shovel. If you are concerned that the animal might have been rabid, please call your local animal control.

You should take special care in handling a dead snake. A snake's body is capable of "biting" through reflex action up to several hours after death. If the snake is venomous, it can also inject venom after death.

How do you know if an animal is dead? Obvious signs are rigor mortis (stiffening) and an eyes open stare. If the animal is still warm, the caller can check for signs of respiration. Possums can feign death when frightened and slow down their respiration. If there is any doubt, or a possibility the animal is just stunned, it should be placed in a covered box in a quiet place for 2 to 3 hours.

This information is posted with the permission of its authors - the Wildlife Rescue League, Falls Church, VA
rescue wildlife

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